‘Thursday Night Football’ preview: What to watch for in Giants-Washington

‘Thursday Night Football’ preview: What to watch for in Giants-Washington

8:20 ET (NFL Network) | FedEx Field



A year after a dismal 7-9 record was enough to win the NFC East, the NFL’s downtrodden division is 1-3 out the gate, with its first pecking-order game pitting the Washington Football Team against the New York Giants. While last week’s Thursday night clash between Tom Brady and Dak Prescott made for a quarterback thriller, this one figures to be more of a defensive struggle, particularly given that Washington is already operating with a backup quarterback in Saquon Barkley‘>Saquon Barkley in primetime, the Pittsburgh Steelers bottled the Giants running back in a Monday night game to open the 2020 season for just six yards on 15 carries. With a defensive line comprised of four of their last six first-round draft picks (Montez Sweat‘>Montez Sweat, Ryan Fitzpatrick‘>Ryan Fitzpatrick out indefinitely with a hip injury. He was solid if not spectacular against the Los Angeles Chargers in relief of Fitzpatrick last week, in a losing effort. But at some point, every winning team needs its quarterback to be spectacular, at least in spots. It’s Heinicke’s chance to shine and, at the same time, build some staying power for his career. Kyle Allen awaits if things go badly. After adding QB Kadarius Toney‘>Kadarius Toney played just five snaps against the Broncos, and while free-agent signee Evan Engram‘>Evan Engram didn’t play at all. He’s also been ruled out for Thursday night. Barkley played less than half the snaps (28 of 59). If reps for Toney and Barkley are ramped up, Jones will have a better complement of his weapons, and all the more pressure on him to perform.

4) Third-down money

An emphasis for the WFT coaching staff this week has to be on third-down efficiency, on both sides of the ball. Washington was dominated in that area by the Chargers last week, converting just 30 percent of third downs offensively (three of 10), and defensively, allowing a brutal 74 percent (14 of 19). That helped translate to 36:03 in possession time for the Chargers, and the Washington offense’s inability to develop any rhythm. The defense is supposed to be the strength of this team, so it starts with that group getting off the field. But the offense has to sustain more drives to keep the defense from fatiguing, whether than means more totes for RB